E2compr 0.4 User Manual – locating other links

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Let’s say that I notice that the file referenced by the file name`quux’ has more than one link:

$ ls -li quux 33059 -rw-r–r– 2 reiter staff 172340 Jun 30 17:08 quux

To find the other links (names) of a file, you need to know the file’sinode number, and in general also its filesystem (or rather the mountpoint of that filesystem).

You can see the inode number when you give the `-i’ (or`–inode’) option to ls. In the above example (`ls-li’), it’s the left-most field, 33059.

To find what filesystem a file belongs to, do `df file’. Themount-point of this filesystem is the last field, under the heading`Mounted on’. So in our example:

$ df quuxFilesystem 1024-blocks Used Available Capacity Mounted on/dev/hda2 149806 123118 18952 87% /home

so the relevant mount point is `/home’.

Putting it all together, the general command is findmountpoint -xdev -inum inum (optionally –or necessarily,if you don’t use GNU find– followed by `-ls’, `-print’ orsome such). To continue our above example:

$ find /home -xdev -inum 33059 -ls 33059 169 -rw-r–r– 2 reiter staff 172340 Jun 30 17:08 /home/gonzo/corge 33059 169 -rw-r–r– 2 reiter staff 172340 Jun 30 17:08 /home/reiter/quux

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